On to Arkansas: Interdependencies to Exhibit in the South

textile collage

Racking it up state by state.

Interdependency #3 & Interdependency #4 were accepted into the 2012 Annual Juried Art Competition at the South Arkansas Arts Center in El Dorado, AR. The exhibition will run from July 6 – 31, 2012.

textile collage
Interdependency # 3 : cotton lace, silk, cheesecloth, thread, wood & glass beads, metal, acrylic paint

_________________________________________________________________________

textile collage

Interdependency # 4: silk, cotton, cheesecloth, thread, raku-fired porcelain, seeds, acrylic paint

These were fun, intuitive pieces to do. I allowed them to grow into what they wanted to be, which can be a challenge for my brain that is usually shouting, “Plan, Plan, Plan!” at the top of its mental lungs. I also used the opportunity to use some of porcelain buttons I had made quite a while ago and had been yearning to find a good use for.

One State at a time: Unable to Divide Heads to Maryland

Unable to Divide, a lace work piece in red, orange, and yellow thread has been accepted into the national juried exhibition, Fiber Options: Material Explorations, hosted by the Maryland Federation of Art.

It will exhibit in Annapolis, MD from July 19 to August 11, 2012. I was one of 65 artists chosen from over 300 entries.

__________________
This meaning of this work draws from some of my mental struggles with incorporating tenants of yogic philosophy (I’m a certified yoga teacher, btw). While I can intellectually understand certain contepts, the practice and experience of it can be quite another thing, especially with this over-chatty brain of mine. What can I say, I’m a work in progress. 🙂

Lace Sculpture Test

_____________________
Last weekend, I dabbled in 3-D lace sculpture. This is to one, be able to show the artist I’ll be studying under in Colorado the type of 3D forms I am thinking of and two, I am starting work on yet another proposal for a potential residency in 2013 and need to show examples of my thought process.  Here’s the result of the first attempt. It’s a wee thing, around seven inches in length, five inches high.

Last Call on Artwork Giveaway. Plus Bonus Entry!

The contest ends today!
Share, forward and toss gently to those who you like enough to want them to win!

–I wouldn’t mind if you shared with others too, but, you know, I’ll leave that to you.- 🙂

PLUS: TODAY ONLY BONUS ENTRY FOR TWITTER
Retweet Today’s Tweet & get an extra entry!

Tree of Mine / 100% cotton thread / 9 x 9″ / 2012

 You can enter the drawing by doing one or more of the following and posting what you did in the comments section :
  1. Subscribe to my blog via email (click Home & see right sidebar), RSS feed, or Google reader.
  2. Like my Facebook Artist Page (NOT my personal facebook page)
  3. Follow me on Twitter
You must make a separate comment below confirming each action you take. Pretty please. This is how I track your entries!

Each action counts as one entry, so do all three, and get three chances to win! Deadline for entries is May 31, 11:59pm, CST. Open to continental US only.

First Ever Artwork Giveaway!

Yup. This lacework piece based on Can’t See the Forest for the Tress, (now on display at the Mulvane Art Museum in Topeka, KS), could be yours. For free. For real.

Tree of Mine / 100% cotton thread / 9 x 9″ / 2012

 You can enter the drawing by doing one or more of the following and posting what you did in the comments section :
  1. Subscribe to my blog via email (click Home & see right sidebar), RSS feed, or Google reader.
  2. Like my Facebook Artist Page (NOT my personal facebook page)
  3. Follow me on Twitter
You must make a separate comment below confirming each action you take. Pretty please. This is how I track your entries!

Each action counts as one entry, so do all three, and get three chances to win! Deadline for entries is May 31, 11:59pm, CST. Open to continental US only.

New Work and Process: Seeing the Signs

Seeing the Signs
cotton (Gütermann) thread, hand dyed Shetland & Angora wool
49 x 36 x 1/16″

ImageImage_______________________________________________________________________________

This technically is quilting. Will it keep you warm at night? Nope. Well, maybe you could wrap each one around various limbs, but that wouldn’t get my vote. But still, it’s basically quilting, promise. Using free-motion embroidery on a quilt “sandwich” is the basic formula for a quilt.  I’ve even used the traditional wool batting, or meat layer of the sandwich if you will, that they would have used in olden days. Granted, my Shetland wool is hand dyed hot pink and ok, a little non-traditionally, I’ve thrown in some angora (uber fluffy bunny fur) for accent. To top it off, the pieces are lightly hand-felted.

And here’s how…

______________________________________________________________

After felting and rinsing, they are left to drip-dry overnight or until we need to take a shower. 🙂

Oh, and why hot pink, you say? Why not hot pink, I say. I see these as sign posts or markers or some kind so a color that says “pay attention” was needed. Also. there are tons of little eyes one each one (at least, that’s what I see). This piece has something to do with the ability or inability to really see what’s in front of you and what’s coming, not just visually but psychologically, emotionally, etc.

Mindpool 2012 Juried Exhibition

______________________________________________________________________

Mindpool 2012: Where streams of consciousness collect. An exhibit of artwork that was created relying heavily on intuition. When artists allow the element of risk into their creative process, the opportunity for surprise is increased. Sometimes these surprises are called happy accidents.
Juror: Kara Duncan of Vertigo Art Space

___________________________________________________________________

My selected piece is titled Thought Splatter. My work is usually planned, planned, planned. So I took this as a little challenge. My intent was to throw down thoughts in the form of threads. I spontaneously stitched a free-form paint splatter and free-motion stitched my stream-of-conscious thoughts onto water soluble stabilizer. Water, of course, dissolved all those thoughts into a undiscernible web.

To attach it to the prepared canvas with a bit of “float” space, I borrowed my boyfriend’s method* of decorating chocolate covered strawberries, ie., I filled a plastic sandwich baggie with molding paste, snipped a corner, and squeezed a thick line along the edges.

*Note: Boyfriend does not advocate using molding paste to decorate strawberries. “Pro tip,” as he would say.

Process Images – Can’t See the Forest for the Trees

As promised, here are some process pictures of making Can’t See the Forest for the Trees!

 

1) Thumbnails, compositional sketches (negative and positive space), threading samples. This took quite a chuck of time and yet it fits in such a small picture!

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

full size template. I have a soft place in my heart for the incredibly helpful employee at the Downtown FedEx Office! It had been years since I had made one of the gigantic templates.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

pinning together sections of stabilizer; later I switched to a more fabric-like stabilizer (Floriani Wen N Gone Water Soluble Stabilizer) rather than this plastic type, (Sulky Super Solvy). The fabric type has much better tensile strength, which is advantageous when working on a large scale and constantly  having to move the embroidery hoop around.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Initially, I’d draw the whole section out in pencil on trace paper and then trace it with sharpie or pen onto the stabilizer. By the last couple of sections, I was confident enough to just draw straight onto the stabilizer without it planned out.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

My new (well, via Fabric Recycles, so new to me) embroidery hoop’s grand debut! I’m sewing with all Gütermann thread: 100% Natural Cotton as well as polyester lightweight bobbin thread.  Unfortunately, by this point, I was very much nose to the grindstone and didn’t take any pictures of the pinning and rinsing process. Next time, next time. However, in a nutshell, after sewing, I trim the excess stabilizer, pin the section to foam (with varying degrees of pin density based on how accurate or abstract I want the image to be), and rinse it (also to a varying degree) in the sink or in the shower based on the size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very time-intensive work, but the end result is satisfying.

Superclusters (of thread)

Superclusters (Left)

_____________________________________________________________

Superclusters  (Right)

______________________________________________________________

Billboards are typically utilized as a way of advertising commercial products or services on a large scale. Playing on this idea, these images for the Missouri Bank Art Boards (Fall 2012) represent the largest structures in the universe presently known to mankind. In a time filled with economic gloom, where one debt crisis after another rises to the surface of our attention, it is easy to lose perspective on the true scale of things. Perhaps a reminder is in order for what constitutes a big deal on a universal level and the biggest deal of all is, in fact, galaxy superclusters.

Galaxies cluster together due to gravity, and then these groups of galaxies also cluster on an even larger scale into sheets and filaments, creating galaxy superclusters (incidentally, our little galaxy makes its home in the Virgo Supercluster).

In this representation of galaxy superclusters, materials and process are as important as the image itself. The filament-like nature of images of superclusters is represented by threads. A web of delicate threads is created by using a film that stabilizes the threads while sewing. The film is later dissolved (to a degree in other works), leaving voids. Incidentally, astronomers theorize that the voids between galaxy superclusters may not be empty, but home to mysterious dark matter. The use and removal of the film acknowledges a structure that exists but is invisible.

 This submission also plays into a subject that needs advertising with the American youth:  science. From the United States ending the NASA shuttle program this summer, depending on Russia to get American astronauts off the ground to the 2011 shut down of the Tevatron, the once awesome particle accelerator near Chicago that is now obsolete due to Europe’s Large Hadron Collider, our country is falling behind in scientific innovation.

Can’t See the Forest for the Trees

Woefully behind in blogging, yes. 2011 was a tumultuous year. But moving on, here’s the latest work: Can’t See the Forest for the Trees. 3×9′ (yes, feet) of cotton & polyester thread (Gütermann) and pins (but not as many pins as you’d think). From initial concept to finished work, this took about two months. I hope to post about the process within the week.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Process is integral to my work and often becomes intertwined with concept as in Can’t See the Forest for the Trees. It is essentially about being lost, about losing perspective (literally or metaphysically) based on one’s position in time and space and how subjective clarity can be.

As such, every detail of the forest was meticulously drawn and stitched with varying degrees of density. Through a finishing process, details closest to the forest floor stay relatively clear. Moving upward, details become fuzzy until we reach the canopy where many details dissolve into abstraction.

A significant part of its making is the fact that part of the work itself was lost in its manifestation. Even the viewer’s interaction with the piece is determined by the viewer’s relative position to the work.

It is the constant play between being able to see the details and the (often elusive) big picture, whatever that picture may be.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Seen individually, the thread structures form random shapes. Many details become visible up close, but the shapes have little meaning unless seen from a “big picture” perspective.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

My eyes go straight to the bunny in this image, though I had hoped to emphasize the frog at the very bottom. Ah well.